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Oral Surgery - Dental Implant Surgery (What To Expect)

Updated: May 19, 2023


During your Dental Implant surgery, the dentist or oral surgeon will make an incision in your gum and drill a hole into the jawbone to insert the dental implant. Once the implant is in place, a healing process takes place as the bone grows around the implant and secures it in place. This process can take several months, after which the implant is fully integrated with the jawbone and ready for the placement of an abutment and crown.


Another common oral surgery procedure is wisdom teeth removal. Wisdom teeth, also known as third molars, often need to be removed because they can cause pain, infection, or damage to adjacent teeth. The procedure is usually done under local anesthesia, with or without sedation. The dentist or oral surgeon will make an incision in the gum tissue and remove the tooth. After the procedure, you'll be given instructions for aftercare, such as how to manage pain and swelling.


Sleep apnea, a condition that causes interrupted breathing during sleep, can also be treated with oral surgery. One such treatment is the removal of excess tissue in the throat to widen the airway and improve breathing. The procedure is called uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) and involves removing excess tissue from the soft palate, uvula, and pharynx.


No matter what type of oral surgery you need, it's important to choose a dentist or oral surgeon who is experienced and skilled in performing the procedure. They should also take the time to explain the procedure, answer your questions, and address any concerns you may have. By choosing the right dental professional and following their aftercare instructions, you can ensure a safe and successful outcome for your oral surgery


WHAT IS DENTAL IMPLANT SURGERY?

The dental implant surgery is performed in stages, with the first step being the surgical placement of the implant into the jawbone. The implant is typically made of titanium, which has the ability to fuse with the jawbone and create a stable foundation for the artificial tooth.

After the implant has been placed, a period of healing is necessary to allow the implant to integrate with the surrounding bone. This process is known as osseointegration and can take several months to complete. During this time, a temporary tooth replacement may be provided to ensure proper function and aesthetics.


Once the implant has fully fused with the bone, the second stage of the surgery can begin. This involves attaching an abutment to the implant, which serves as a connector between the implant and the artificial tooth.


The final stage of the process involves the placement of the artificial tooth, which is custom-made to match the shape and color of the surrounding teeth. The artificial tooth is securely attached to the abutment, providing a natural-looking and functional replacement for the missing tooth.


Overall, dental implant surgery is a safe and effective way to replace missing teeth and restore dental function. With proper care and maintenance, dental implants can last a lifetime, making them a worthwhile investment in your oral health.


HOW IS A DENTAL IMPLANT SURGERY PERFORMED?

The crux of how a dental implant surgery is performed depends on the type of implant to be used and the condition of your jawbone. Dental implant surgery may involve several procedures done in increments to allow bone ingrowth and healing. Because of this, the process can take several months to complete.


Here we guide you through the various dental implant surgery steps and what you can expect.

  1. Initial evaluation

Once your oral surgeon has evaluated your mouth and teeth and determined that you are a good candidate for dental implant surgery, the procedure itself can begin. Before the surgery, you will be given local anesthesia to numb the area where the implant will be placed. If you are anxious or have dental phobia, you can discuss with your dentist or oral surgeon about options for sedation to help you relax during the procedure.

During the surgery, the oral surgeon will make a small incision in your gum tissue to expose the jawbone and then drill a hole into the bone where the implant will be placed. After placing the implant, the gum tissue will be stitched back up and a temporary cover screw or healing cap will be placed over the implant to protect it while it integrates with the bone over the coming months.

The healing process, also known as osseointegration, is critical to the success of the dental implant. During this time, the bone in your jaw will grow and fuse with the implant, creating a strong and stable foundation for the artificial tooth. The length of the healing process varies for each patient, but typically takes several months.

Once the implant has integrated with the bone, you will return to your dentist or oral surgeon to have the temporary cover screw or healing cap removed and an abutment attached to the implant. The abutment serves as a connector between the implant and the artificial tooth. Finally, the artificial tooth, also known as a crown, will be attached to the abutment, completing the dental implant process.

It is important to maintain good oral hygiene habits after the surgery, such as brushing and flossing regularly, to keep the implant healthy and prevent infection. With proper care, dental implants can last a lifetime and give you the confidence to smile and eat comfortably again.

  1. Tooth extraction (if needed)

After the tooth extraction, the implant procedure will begin. The surgeon will make a small incision in the gum tissue to expose the jawbone and then drill a hole into it where the dental implant will be inserted. The implant is screwed tightly into the jawbone, where it is left to fuse with the bone for several months.


Once the implant has successfully fused with the jawbone, the abutment, or the connector piece, is attached to the implant. This piece will serve as the anchor for the artificial tooth, or crown, that will be placed on top.


Your dentist will take impressions of your teeth and mouth to create a customized crown that matches the size, shape, and color of your natural teeth. The crown is then attached to the abutment, completing the dental implant procedure.


After the procedure, it is important to maintain good oral hygiene habits, such as brushing and flossing regularly and attending regular dental check-ups, to ensure the longevity of the dental implant.


  1. Inserting the dental implant and bone grafting (if needed)

Dental implants come in two major varieties, as outlined by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP). The first type is the endosteal implant, which is implanted directly into the jawbone. The second type is the subperiosteal implant, which is placed beneath the gumline.


Given the prevalence of the former, this article will focus on endosteal implants.

One of the key factors in the success of dental implants is the presence of adequate bone material to support the implant. In cases where this is lacking, surgeons will graft bone from a different area of the jaw, away from the implant site. Once the bone has healed, a hole is drilled into the jawbone, into which the implant is inserted and secured in place.


Thanks to the structural and functional connection between the implant and the living bone, modern dental implants are practically indistinguishable from natural teeth. The process of integrating the implant with the bone, known as osseointegration, typically takes between six weeks and six months to complete and heal.


  1. Abutment placement

After your dental implant has reached a stable state, your dentist will proceed to attach an abutment onto the implant. The abutment acts as a bridge between the implant and the artificial crown, and must be secured tightly in order to endure the forces exerted by biting and chewing. During this procedure, the area will be numbed with a local anesthetic, and you should only experience a minor sensation of pressure.


  1. Adding the permanent crown

After your gums have healed, your dentist will design an artificial crown for you using an impression of your mouth. The dental crown is then placed.



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